The Value of the Live Performance

Yesterday I went to Lincoln Center to hear the NY Philharmonic. I love this activity. I’m hooked. My formula is usually:

  • Cheaper Seats x More Concerts  = JOY

(Although, yesterday’s seats were a little too crummy, even for me. It is good to discover your limits.)

In a time when any piece of music can be heard by commanding Siri, people underestimate the value of the live performance. And, by the way, although I love to hear that my students have been to a classical performance, I am referring to any type of live performance.

So here are some reasons to jump in with both feet and experience live music.

In no particular order:

  • No “devices” allowed.
  • Dress up clothes are encouraged.
  • The event feels special.
  • Musicians have skills worth seeing. They act as a team. There is a quarterback, special teams, kickers. They must play with precision, moving and breathing together.
  • Watching an instrument being played is amazing.
  • Hearing music you never heard before is educational.
  • Live music sounds and “feels” different than a recording.
  • Depending on the venue, certain behavior and ritual is expected. This is all part of the discipline of music.

Here are a few suggestions.

  • Before you go, listen to the pieces you will hear. You don’t have to study them, just play them in the background so they are familiar.
  • Bring a little pair of binoculars. Even from the cheap seats you can see the instruments close up.
  • When you sit in the theatre, check out the program.  There are often notes that guide you to listen for certain elements. That makes it more fun. Some of the pieces tell a story.

I highly encourage you to give your family the gift of this experience. It does not have to cost a lot. For a little more than the price of a movie ticket, you can share this experience. You will be making a life-long memory.

Because, you know,

… Music Lasts a Lifetime

 

Ready, Set, Practice

By now your family’s schedule is in place. Surely there are cancelled games and last minute birthday parties, but you are organized enough to make that work. The days are about to get shorter which means a little more “inside the house” time. This is the perfect time to encourage your children to get in a little more practice at the piano.

Getting into the habit of practicing is half the challenge. Every day, even a few minutes, is better than a crash course the night before the lesson. Playing the piano is a physical exercise. Your fingers have to get in shape.

Parents have told me that they have many different ways to encourage their children to practice. Some play first thing in the morning and others right before bed. Some set a timer while others have their children play each piece a certain number of times. There is no “right” way. The only sure thing is… practice makes perfect … or at least more perfect.

However you fit practicing into the daily schedule, there are three pretty easy ideas you can implement when encouraging your child to practice.

  1. Remind your child to practice. Truly they forget. Make your reminder as positive as you can.
  2.  Listen to them play. You don’t have to sit right there, but they need to know you were paying attention.
  3.  Say something encouraging after they play. “That is sounding better” “Nice work” “I like that song”

Remember, learning how to “play” an instrument is hard work. It is physically and intellectually challenging. However, once you get into the habit, it is a whole lot of fun.